‘Trains and sports good, computers bad’, says Winston

Winston Peters’ objection to handouts for Wynyard Group is rich coming from the king of corporate welfare himself, says ACT Leader David Seymour.

“On the same day we hear money may be given to Duco Events for the Joseph Parker fight, Winston instead turns his sights on the payments given to Wynyard Group, a software firm.

“It’s no surprise. Gravy for sports companies is the kind of feel-good corporate welfare Winston supports. He just draws the line at new-fangled computer companies he doesn't understand.

Who will be held accountable for misuse of police checkpoints?

“People have the right to meet and discuss issues without fear of police harassment,” says ACT Leader David Seymour. “The admission that the police used a drink-driving check point to obtain the identities of people attending a meeting is deeply un-Kiwi.

Highlights from the House - 25/10/2016

We’ve just come out of a two-week sitting period in the House. Highlights for ACT included David Seymour challenging the Minister of Commerce on the red tape threatening peer-to-peer lending platforms, and delivered a comprehensive takedown of Chris Hipkins’ private members’ bill that seeks to abolish partnership schools:

ACT commends Diane Maxwell for starting debate

ACT Leader David Seymour is commending Retirement Commissioner Diane Maxwell for starting the conversation New Zealanders need to have about Super and retirement, and challenging other leaders to put their cards on the table for younger voters to see before next years' election.

Prison blowout is actually a reoffending blowout

The government’s billion-dollar prison budget blowout shows they have failed to tackle reoffending and recidivism, and need to be smarter on crime, says ACT Leader David Seymour.

“Bill English has said himself that our prisons are a ‘moral and fiscal failure’, but the Government has not found ways to stop the cost of our prison population from growing.

“Corrections figures show a massive 69% of people starting new sentences have been sentenced previously. This reveals how our prison population blowout is largely a reoffending blowout.