Excuses to avoid tax cuts don’t stack up

The Government’s excuses for delaying tax cuts don’t stack up, says ACT Leader David Seymour in the wake of Treasury’s Half Year Update.

“Bill English admitted today that, even after earthquake costs are taken into account, a $473 million surplus remains. So why is Bill English talking down tax cuts when he knows he can afford them?

“We could, for example, update tax brackets to reflect changing incomes. It’s ridiculous that workers enter the top (33%) tax bracket when they earn just $70,000.

How to cut tax after an earthquake: eliminate waste

Taxpayers and earthquake victims would benefit if the government tackled wasteful spending, says ACT Leader David Seymour.

“The opposition is using the Kaikoura recovery bill as an excuse to rubbish potential tax cuts. But they're actually letting the Government get off easy,” says Mr Seymour.

“ACT says it’s possible to fully fund the recovery, while cutting tax at the same time. The Government just has to finally get tough on the enormous waste that occurs in its existing spending.

Lower unemployment? Time for tax cuts

The Government’s strong employment figures, on top of the recovering milk prices, are another reason we should cut taxes, says ACT Leader David Seymour in the wake of new employment figures.

“As more people move into employment, the Government sucks up extra revenue from income tax and spends less on benefits. That creates space to give workers some long-awaited tax relief.

Why not cut tax today?

The Government could cut taxes today if it wanted, says ACT Leader David Seymour.

“Taxpayers shouldn’t be bribed and manipulated with the vague whiff of tax cuts. Instead, the Government should cut taxes now, then campaign in 2017 on its record, instead of just promises. There’s nothing in the law that forces the Government to wait for a Budget to cut taxes.

Why is National boasting about taxing New Zealanders?

The Government’s boast about income redistribution takes campaigning from the right and governing from the left to a whole new level, says ACT Leader David Seymour.

“The National Party has quit hiding its socialist streak – it’s boasting about it,” says Mr Seymour.

Let’s not set back taxpayers’ rights by 327 years

Michael Woodhouse’s move to bypass parliamentary approval of tax changes via Orders of Council would take taxpayers’ rights back 327 years, says ACT Leader David Seymour. The move was first noticed by the Taxpayers’ Union last week.

“The Bill of Rights 1689, a mainstay of New Zealand law, is clear: no taxes should be levied without the authority of Parliament," says Mr Seymour. "So why is Michael Woodhouse breaking 327 years of precedent? And why didn’t he propose the change earlier, when it could have been debated in the Taxation Bill’s first reading?

Labour on Shewan report: then and now

Andrew Little, then:

“John Key’s decision to appoint John Shewan to review New Zealand’s dodgy foreign trust rules shows a serious lack of judgement . . . A closed door review led by Mr Shewan will not restore our international reputation which has been so damaged by the Panama Papers.”

Time to close ‘charitable purpose’ tax loophole

ACT Leader David Seymour used Question Time today to call on the Government to scrap the ‘charitable purpose’ tax loophole exploited by certain businesses at the expense of others.

“Taxpaying businesses are at a competitive disadvantage due to certain companies’ tax-free status," said Mr Seymour.  "This destroys the principle of a competitive marketplace.

Budget increases taxes on those in need

ACT regrets an enormous lost opportunity to cut tax for some of those most in need.  Instead, the government has delivered those households a $1200 a year tax increase.

"Currently, the average smoker smokes 10.6 cigarettes per day, taxed at 67c each, making $7.09 per day or $2,588 per year," says ACT Leader David Seymour.

Budget 2016: Do you feel rich at $70K?

People earning $70,000 aren’t rich, and shouldn’t be taxed as though they are, says ACT Leader David Seymour.

“No-one on a five-figure salary should have to pay a 33% tax rate. Seventy thousand was once big money, but inflation and rising wages have pushed more and more workers into this top tax bracket.

“These aren’t rich pricks. These are hard-working Kiwis paying off mortgages and raising families. Yet National taxes them at 33%. The top tax bracket shouldn’t cut in until someone earns at least $100,000.

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