Free Press 25/05/2015

We Rate the Budget Speeches
Free Press observed the Budget Speeches live.  The media underreported the Government’s momentum and the opposition’s flat-footedness.  It was one-way traffic as the opposition sat dumbfounded at National stealing their policies. 

Which New Zealanders, Bill?

Bill English can't claim to speak for all New Zealanders on the future of NZ Super, says ACT Leader David Seymour.
 
"Bill English has accepted that Superannuation costs will balloon by a billion dollars extra each year but says New Zealanders are ok with this.  What he won’t say is, which New Zealanders?
 

ACT responds to Key’s RMA backdown

The Prime Minister’s backdown on the RMA is disappointing but not surprising, says ACT leader David Seymour.

“If we’re serious about councils allowing the next generation to build homes, we need to get some guts. We cannot have an act of parliament preoccupied with telling councils that building houses is inappropriate.”

In his Budget speech Mr Seymour pointed out, “The words inappropriate subdivision appear 156 times in the Resource Management Act, three of them in the principles sections.”

ACT offers Labour a way out of NZ Super gaffe

ACT leader David Seymour today welcomed Labour engaging the debate over NZ Super’s future, but says they need to change tactics.

“Andrew Little appeared in The Herald to endorse means testing for superannuation before distancing himself from the idea within hours.

“He has shown why an issue with such important long term implications might be better handled under ACT’s referendum proposal.

ACT welcomes Budget's focus on poorest families

ACT Leader David Seymour welcomes the moves to focus spending on the poorest families.

“One of the problems with government is the pointless churning of income, taxing middle income families and then returning it to them with government spending,” said Mr Seymour.

“A good example of that is the $1,000 Kiwisaver kick-start, which I am pleased to see axed.

“The move to boost core benefit rates is a welcome move, in combination with the welfare reforms to date and the tougher work tests proposed.

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